How to see the history of the Confederacy

What you need to know about the American Civil War (1861-65): 1.

The Confederate flag and the war that ended it.

The flag of the Union is flown at half mast at the statehouse in Raleigh, North Carolina, on August 14, 1861.

It was the first flag to be flown by a union army, a position it held until the end of the war.

It flew over the Capitol on December 19, 1861, as a symbol of the country’s victory over the Confederacy.

The Southern states that joined the Union in 1861 were divided into Confederate states and Confederate Territories, which were separate territories under the Union.

They had separate military forces and were at war with each other.

Confederate States of America, or Confederate States, was the name given to the southern states that declared independence from the Union and fought against the Union, and the Confederate States League was a union of states that united the northern states into one body and united the South under the unified banner of the Confederate flag.

The name “Confederate” is derived from the French word for “flag of the north” and was used in the US by some people to identify themselves.

The Confederacy had several flags, but the one that captured the attention of the general public was the flag of a new nation, the Confederate Stars and Bars.

The Stars and Bar was a flag that had been created by Thomas Jefferson to be the flag for the United States of the United Kingdom (a name he used to describe himself, according to the Flag Book).

The Stars & Bars was not a flag of war, but a flag with the colors of the new nation on it.

It symbolized the unity of the two nations and represented the power of the British monarchy.

The stars were a symbol for the union of all of the people of the Northern and Southern states.

The design of the Stars & Bags flag was also based on the designs of the three great British royal families of England.

The stripes were divided to make a diamond and the cross formed the top of a star, which symbolizes the union.

The Union Jack, the flag that was flown at the White House in Washington, DC, in January, 1861 by President Abraham Lincoln, was also a design based on those of the Great British monarchs.

2.

The Civil War was the biggest conflict in US history.

It saw the start of the American Revolutionary War and the start and ending of the Civil War.

The American Civil war was a civil war between the Southern states of the US (the Confederate States), the North (the Union States), and the Federal government (the Confederacy).

It lasted from 1861 until 1865.

During the war, there were over two million deaths.

3.

The Battle of Bull Run was the bloodiest battle in US military history.

The battle, in which more than 1,400 Union soldiers were killed, marked the beginning of the end to the Union armies victory over Confederate forces.

4.

The largest battle in American history was the battle of Bull Rush in 1864, a battle that saw more than 3,000 Union soldiers and 3,500 Confederate soldiers killed.

5.

In the final battle of the conflict, the Union won the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863.

6.

The last major battle of America’s Civil War involved the Battle Of Bull Run, the largest engagement in US Civil War history.

7.

The US Civil war lasted from June 1862 until June 1865.

8.

In 1865, the war between Northern and southern states ended.

9.

The most famous US soldier was Abraham Lincoln.

The United States Army of the Potomac, which was made up of US troops, had been founded in 1833 and was named after the general who defeated Napoleon Bonaparte in 1815.

In 1864 the United Nations designated the city of Gettyburg, Pennsylvania, as the capital of the state of Pennsylvania.

The first flag of Gettys new state was the Union Flag.

It had two stars and the motto “In God We Trust”.

It was flown over the city at half-mast, as symbolizing unity.

It became the first state flag of America.

It came into use during the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and was adopted by President Lyndon Johnson in 1965.

10.

Civil rights leaders and prominent figures including Martin Luther King, Jr. and John Lewis fought for equality in America.

11.

The National Park Service is the nation’s largest public land management agency, and it manages 1.3 million acres of public lands in the United State.

12.

The Lincoln Memorial, the US Capitol, and other public buildings in Washington D.C., are named for US presidents Abraham Lincoln and James Madison.

They are named after Abraham Lincoln’s father, William Lincoln.

13.

The South was one of the last states to secede from the union in 1861.

The state of Alabama seceded in 1861, which prompted the state to join the Union as well. 14.